Where do games fit in the future of entertainment?

The game industry already rakes in billions every year. Is it a sign of the future, or will something else rise to take games’ place?

Nokia invited Anne to Finland for their inaugural Open Labs workshop. She will be running a workshop on the future of entertainment. Fellow presenters James Whatley, CT Moore, and Glenn Letham will run workshops covering “Neighborhood,” “Business/Work,” and “Connected Life.” If she can get her Nokia phone working in Finland (ha ha), she will be sharing what she learns via Twitter. If you happen to be in Helsinki, make sure to comment here if you’d like to meet up.

In the meantime, where do you think the future of entertainment lies? Which media do you think will win the big prize for dominance in the future? Will it be games? Or will user-generated content on sites like YouTube rule?

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6 Comments

Filed under Prediction, Writers Cabal

6 responses to “Where do games fit in the future of entertainment?

  1. So far it seems like humanity still loves linear media. Perhaps books will give way to digital text and movies will give way to video files, but it’ll still basically be the same entertainment. There is a possibility for people to start embracing less linear forms of entertainment, but it will take a while. There are already lots of tools popping up to help people create games and interactive experiences (The Sims Carnival, Game Maker)…Also, I believe one of the most important developments of the information age is the wiki. Wikis really drive home the fact that information is best organized in a nonlinear fashion. So, there’s a possibility, but it will take a while.

    Imagine a parent who, instead of telling a child a story, makes a game for them. If that scenario ever starts looking ordinary, then games will have truly come into their own.

  2. Hey, John. I just learned that people who create completely original content with tools account for only 1% of players. Up to 10% percent will expand on/retool existing content. What is the future for the 90 percent who just play existing content?

    -Anne

  3. The world will always need storytellers. The medium for storytellers is constantly changing, but the core is still the same. Very few parents actually write stories for their kids, and probably even fewer will actually make a game for them.

  4. Anne: Basically, my post was saying “There’s a possibility for change if X happens”. Maybe there won’t be any change, I don’t know. 😛

    But actually your post is about a different point. I’m curious about your statistic; Does that cover only games, or also more linear things like YouTube? My gut feeling is that the statistic you quote doesn’t have any bearing on the discussion, because it will apply whether we’re talking about games or not.

    I guess my point is that I believe the important distinction is between games and other, more linear media…So I’m a little confused why the original post contrasted games with “user-generated content”! After all, Spore. (And many others.)

  5. Sorry about the lag in responding — travel, you know. I was contrasting UGC on YouTube versus UGC *in* games, not games versus UGC, of course.

    The statistic from my comment comes from games only. I don’t know the statistics for sites like YouTube.

    -Anne

  6. Pingback: Writers Cabal’s 2008 Year in Review « Writers Cabal Blog

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